Camp safety

The camp organiser is responsible for ensuring that the camp is safe.

You can promote the safety of the camp by planning the camp carefully and assessing the risks. At the same time, you can provide unforgettable experiences for the customers.

 

Who monitors the safety of the service?

 

 

Tukes monitors camps from the perspective of customer safety, but camp activities are often also under the supervision of health protection authorities with regard to food services and accommodation, for instance.

 

Documents in order

 

The camp organiser must draw up a safety document, if the camp offers adventure or programme services, such as horseback riding, paddling, climbing or challenging hikes, or if the campers have the opportunity to swim either in natural waters or a swimming pool. Concerning other types of camps with a lower risk, the camp organiser themselves must assess whether a safety document is needed.

A safety document can always be useful in improving the safety of the camp.

 

Identify the risks

Camp organiser, you need to identify the following risks and minimise the hazards they cause:

  • Make sure that a person who is of age and has rescue and first aid skills monitors the campers at the beach and during boating and other water activities.
  • Make sure that the beach used by the campers has the necessary equipment for rescue and calling for help, such as a notice board with emergency instructions, including contact information, and a lifebuoy.
  • Find out in advance whether the campers can swim!
  • If you organise riding camps, also take account of the safety of the rest of the leisure time programme in addition to riding.
  • At riding camps, pay careful attention to selecting a suitable horse for each rider. The participants of riding camps include riders with different skill levels.
  • In climbing, check the areas being used in order to ensure that falling climbers cannot injure themselves.
  • Monitor the use of trampolines and limit the number of jumpers on the trampoline at the same time. The safest option is to instruct the campers to jump one at a time.

 

 

Good safety practices

 

When organising camps, take the following into account:

  • Keep a record of accidents and dangerous situations. Make corrections based on the observations. Tukes must be notified about serious accidents or incidents.
  • Draw up a safety document, in which you identify the risks of the service. In camp activities, attention should be paid to limiting activities during times such as late at night, when the campers are already tired and more prone to accidents.
  • If the camp includes boating, make sure that the boats are sufficiently equipped: a bailer, an anchor and a rope as well as oars in working order, without forgetting the drain plug, if the boat has one. All campers on a boat must wear a life jacket.
  • Before the camps, review how to act in case of an emergency with the whole personnel.

     

What to take into account in the planning

 

When planning camps, take the following into account:

  • customer groups, special groups, people who cannot swim
  • the need for supervisors
  • the conditions and programme
  • the routes for e.g. hikes and trail riding
  • the weather conditions
  • actions of the personnel in case of emergencies
  • drawing up a safety document.

 

Requirements on the equipment

 

  • Make sure that trampolines are suitable for use by the customers. Check the condition of the trampoline’s safety net and supervise the activity to ensure that there is only one jumper on the trampoline at a time. If trampoline use cannot be monitored, it should not be offered to the campers.
  • If the camp includes boating, make sure that the boats are sufficiently equipped: a bailer, an anchor and a rope as well as oars in working order, without forgetting the drain plug, if the boat has one. All campers on a boat must wear a life jacket.
  • Make sure that the structures, equipment and gear used in climbing are durable, strong and in good condition by carrying out regular maintenance and checks.
  • During climbing, make sure that there are no structures or equipment in the fall zone, on which falling climbers could hurt themselves.

     

Providing information to customers

 

 

A traditional camp letter lists the equipment and items to be packed for the camp, but Tukes recommends that you also include safety information in the camp letter. Mapping different allergies and illnesses is important for safety, as is the camp programme and the number of supervisors.